Abundant Harvests - garden info, Designing edible landscapes, Vegetable Crop Rotation Wheel

I know, I know, it’s the middle of the holidays. But garden catalogs are pouring through my mail slot, and that means it’s prime time for planning your cool season garden.

After the winter solstice, all those cool season veggies will flourish, and you’ll have amazing harvests. Kale. Collards. Favas. Peas. Chard. Parsley. Cilantro. The list is long and yummy!

Here are a few of the garden-planning  tools we offer — all of them customized for our Los Angeles growing conditions! Continue Reading

Climate solutions

We’re sure that you — like us — have been trying to Simplify your life. Perhaps you’re simplifying because of the economy. Perhaps you’re simplifying because you’ve become aware of the burden that excess consumption is placing on our planet, and on people in third world nations.

This holiday season, we invite you to join us in this different, more meaningful approach. Continue Reading

recipes

In the days leading up to Thanksgiving, several people enjoyed my photos on Instagram of pomegranate processing. Some people begged for the recipe.

The original recipe was something my sister made up years ago, to cope with an over-abundant harvest of pomegranates. Since each of us have pomegranate trees, this Pomegranate-Cranberry Sauce has become standard in our family. And boy, is it GOOD!

It does take a bit of labor, however.

To make Pomegranate Cranberry Sauce, you have to start by processing the fresh fruit. Then you have to make the pomegranate molasses. Lastly, you make cranberry sauce.

Pomegranate molasses can be found in Middle Eastern grocery stores. It is a staple product in several cultures. Or, pomegranate molasses can be made from pomegranate juice you buy in a health food store; there are several recipes on the internet. But we homemake it from our fresh fruit.

Here’s how to DIY, for those who are still interested. Continue Reading

Divestment from fossil fuels

The heat wave this past week really got to me. We don’t have air conditioning in our home, and even if we did, it would be great to insulate our windows to reduce the load on the a/c units and power supply. That’s why I got busy yesterday on a project I’ve meant to do for quite some time: making insulated drapes.

As climate change’s weather weirdness intensifies, we’re likely to get MORE of these intense heat days. So now is the time to begin preparing your home. Plan for hotter in everything you do, from which fruit tree varieties you plant, to what drapes you choose, to installing awnings and shade sails. In the coming decades, temperatures will go up! (Here are more low-tech things you can do to prepare your home for heat)

You can buy thermal drapes online, but they’re heavy, saturated with some kind of weird plastic, and they look like a throwback to the 1970s. And they’re expensive. No thanks.

I wanted more interesting fabrics, and a lower sticker price. Luckily, there are several stores nearby which sell end-lots of upholstery-weight fabric. (A fun one is Fabric Planet on Lincoln Blvd. in L.A. They also have it at -urk- Joann’s).

The thermal drape I make is like a sandwich: decorative fabric, thermal barrier, and liner fabric. Continue Reading

Creating social change

daywowomanHow does one make an impact on “A Day Without a Woman”? In trying to puzzle this out, I consider many of the roles I have played and currently play.

Who does it hurt?

If you’re a mother of young children, you can’t very well “strike” and leave toddlers unfed, babies undiapered. Sure, some women might have the luxury of dumping the kids on some male, but when my kids were small that was simply not an option. It was more of “the buck stops here,” squarely on my shoulders.

If you’re a homeschooling mom, or an after-school-activities mom, you can’t abandon your kids’ education, nor refuse to drive them to classes and activities. Rather than a political statement, it simply hurts your children.

Continue Reading

Creating social change, Economic Resilience

WCN cover 1What if our economic forces were designed to work in partnership with Nature rather than against her? What if our economy promoted the best of human nature — our collaborative, caring and nurturing aspects. What if economic sectors were designed to work in harmony with each other, mimicking a supportive ecosystem? What might such an economy look like?

Whatever Comes Next

the new novel in the Legacy series

Coming soon

from Joanne Poyourow

Click for more info

 

Creating social change

You are one of the most precious assets we have. And by “we” I mean people who view a healthy environment, human rights, and a positive legacy for future generations as a moral obligation.

These current political times demand activism for the long haul. That means we must tag-team, each of us taking our turn in the marches and demonstrations – which unfortunately may be our constant mode of operation for the next 4-8 years.

The fight for these meaningful goals for the long haul means we must take care of ourselves and each other.

Here are some great suggestions on how to do that: Continue Reading

Creating social change

Right to peaceably assemble by Joanne Vana Poyourow 1979
Right to peaceably assemble by Joanne Vana Poyourow 1979

ECM has long been a source of positive environmental news and proactive solutions — about many environmental news, but particularly about global warming.

Right now, this week, is a disheartening time for those who care deeply about our environment and human survival. But I encourage you to tap into what you CAN do…

SHOW UP

(while you still can) Right now, protest rallies and marches are happening on a regular basis. Tune in to your favorite cause – be that climate, noDAPL, Flint water, immigration, voters rights, BlackLivesMatter, gun control, anything that is threatened. And participate in physical rallies whenever you can spare the time.  Continue Reading